Water From Plants

FINDING CLEAN, SAFE WATER SHOULD ALWAYS BE YOUR TOP PRIORITY. YOU CAN SURVIVE THREE WEEKS WITHOUT FOOD, BUT ONLY THREE DAYS WITHOUT WATER, SO FIND IT FAST.

Transpiration
This is one of the most efficient and easily constructed sources of water in an arid setting. Tie a plastic bag around a leafy branch of a medium-sized tree or shrub, and place a container underneath. After a few hours in the Sun, you will have some clean, drinkable water.

Solar Still
This system extracts water from the soil and any plants growing in or placed in a hole. Moisture evaporates, rises and then condenses on the underside of the plastic barrier above, which then drips into a collection container below.

Water from cuttings
Collect as many green leaves and branches as can fit in a plastic bag without touching the sides. Prop up the centre to form a tent. Arrange the bag on a slight slope so that condensation will run down to a collection point.Use rocks to keep the vegetation elevated.

Ground Transpiration
This arrangement works on the same principle as the transpiration method above but with plants that grow close to the ground. Consider scaling up from a plastic bag by using the fly of a tent. Dig out a ringed channel around the vegetation for the water to collect in.

TROPICAL ENVIRONMENTS

Mature Coconut
Use a sharpened stake driven into the ground to split and remove the outer husk and reveal the shell. Drive a hole through a soft "eye" of the shell to access the coconut water.

Green Coconut
Slice open a green coconut with a sharp knife to access the water inside. Drink the coconut water in moderation because it is a natural laxative.

Banana Tree
Cut through the trunk of a banana tree about 10 cm above the ground. Then, hollow out a bowl-like reservoir inside the stump. Water from the roots will gather in the bowl. Scoop the water out of the bowl three times before drinking as the water will be bitter at first.

Green Bamboo
Green bamboo can supply you with fresh water, even at the height of a tropical dry season. To collect water from a young stalk, bend it over, tie it securely, and cut off the top. Water will drip out of the cut. Collect it in a container.

Water from a vine
Cut a section of a vine high up. Then, sever it completely near the ground. Liquid will drain out the bottom. Don't drink from the vines that produce white sap or milky liquid when cut. Get rid of liquid that has a sour or bitter taste.

Big Bamboo
For larger shoots of green bamboo, simply cut a hold near the base of each section and collect the water within.

Cacti
Cacti are a valuable survival resource in many deserts. The fruits of the prickly pear and some other species are edible. Many cacti contain huge amounts of water in their flesh that can be gathered in solar stills or transpiration bags. Cacti are protected in some areas and should only be used in an emergency.



Paul
Author: Paul

Paul has had an interest in the outdoors since he was a young kid. Walking, tracking and exploring the wilderness around him, from disused overgrown railway lines to the vast wilderness of the UK national parks. Over the last few years Paul has honed his skills into specific areas of bushcraft and survival. He is an expert in map reading, shelter building and knots, traps and fishing.



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